There is one candy every Filipino loves – Yema.

Yema are custard candies that we, Filipinos, inherited from our Spanish colonizers of more than 300 years.

Have you ever wondered how these heavenly-tasting candies came about? It may be so common and made up so basic ingredients but truth is, yema had a very interesting beginning.

The word “yema” actually means  “yolk” in Spanish. During the Spanish occupation, millions of egg whites and egg shells were used to build churches in the country. It was a technique in the olden times to use the egg whites and egg shells as mortar to hold the stones together. That left an abundance of egg yolks. So as not to put them to waste, Filipinos, with their ingenuity and passion for food, gave birth to recipes that call for yolks as one of the main ingredients: cookies (like uraro type), leche flan, and of course, yema.
Ingredients:

Preparation Time: 10 mins
Cooking Time: 30 mins
Yield: 20 pcs -


2 medium sized cans condensed milk
3 egg yolks
1 tbsp margarine or butter
3 tbsp peanuts, chopped
toothpicks or cellophane for wrapping -

Cooking Directions:

1. Pour the condensed milk in a pot over low heat, and then add the egg yolks. Stir.
2. Add the margarine or butter, and keep on stirring until the mixture thickens. Add the chopped peanuts.
3. Stir continuously to avoid burning and sticking at the bottom of the pan. This will also ensure that it is evenly cooked.
4. Lower the heat once the desired consistency is almost achieved which is about 15 to 20 minutes.
5. Let the mixture cool off.
6. Scoop a spoonful of the mixture and start rolling it into a ball or shaping it into a pyramid with your hands.
7. If desired, you can roll them in sugar, stick them in toothpicks or wrap in cellophane or paper.
8. Serve on a dish with your desired presentation. -

Reference:  http://www.filipino-recipes-lutong-pinoy.com
 


Comments

11/03/2014 3:05am

Nowadays, there are plenty of variations on the traditional yema recipe. In Bulacan, arguably the hub for many Filipino candies, they’ve incorporated add-ons like nuts and even ground-up cookies into the candy mixture. The Bulakenyos are also sometimes credited with being the first to reshape the yema into the caramel-colored pyramids that are commonly sold today.

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12/15/2016 9:39am

That delicate candy named as Yema is derived from the egg's yolk. However, it doesn't tastes like egg and too delicate to eat, as I've tried it many times.

Reply
05/04/2017 10:32pm

Whatever that candy is, it surely tastes delicate.

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05/10/2017 9:44pm

Nice information.

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09/01/2017 2:24am

I should probably try to do such candy. Looks like this is really cool recipe!

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10/18/2017 10:29am

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Reply
11/06/2017 4:10am

You are right. These candies are pretty unusual. I will try to make them by myself.

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